BDG variations

 

A complete overview of all Blackmar-Diemer Gambit variations + some related gambit ideas

 

Last update : 29.05.2011

  

This webpage is prepared by Knut Jarle Hjørnevik, and I’m more than happy to receive feedback if you find any errors or if you can provide me with additional information about some of the variations listed below. Just send an email to knutjh@lyse.net

 

If you find this BDG overview interesting you should also take a look at :

 

The BDG tactics page

Sveinung Økland’s collection of BDG games played by chess masters  

 

 

 

 

Contents

 

 

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3

 

 

BDG Accepted :

 

Teichmann Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4

·         Teichhouse Variation : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bd7

·         Teichmann Retreat Variation : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bh5  7.g4 Bg6  8.Ne5

o   Bennett’s Temptation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bh5  7.g4 Bg6  8.Ne5 Nc6  9.Qf3

·         Teichmann Defence, Accepted Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bxf3

Bogoljubow Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6

·         Diemer Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bf4

·         Peters Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Ne5

·         Mad Dog Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.h4

·         Nimzowitch Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.Ne5

·         Kloss Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Kh1

·         Studier Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Qe1

o   Bangiev Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Qe1 Nc6  9.Qh4 Bf5

o   Leisebein Variation : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Qe1 Nc6  9.Qh4 Bg4

o   Kloss Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Qe1 Nc6  9.Qh4 Ng4

·         Studier-Zilbermints Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.h3

Ziegler Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 c6

·         Zilbermints Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 c6  6.a3

·         Alchemy Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 c6  6.Bc4 Bf5  7.0-0 e6  8.Ng5

Kaulich Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 c5

Holwell Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Qd6

Euwe Defence : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 e6

·         Sohm Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3  e6  6.Bf4

·         Clark Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3  e6  6.Bd3 Nc6  7.0-0

·         Duthilleul Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 e6  6.Bg5 Be7  7.Bd3 Nc6  8.Ne4

·         Zilbermints Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 e6  6.Bg5 Be7  7.Bd3 Nc6  8.0-0 Nxd4  9.Kh1

·         Leisebein-Zilbermints Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 e6  6.Bg5 Be7  7.Bd3 0-0  8.Qe2 Nc6  9.0-0 Nxd4  10.Nxd4 Qxd4+  11.Kh1

Gunderam Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bf5

·         Stader System :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bf5  6.Ne5 e6  7.g4 Be4

o   Belka-Neumeyer Line :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bf5  6.Ne5 e6  7.g4 Be4  8.Nxf7

·         Gunderam Sacrifice :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bf5  6.Ne5 e6  7.g4 Ne4

Pietrowsky Defence : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Nc6

Gedult Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 a6

Ritter Defence : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 b6

Schuttler Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Nbd7

Rook Pawn Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 h5

BrentSpar Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Be6

 

 

 

BDG declined at 3rd. move :

Pöhlmann Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 f5

Mieses Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nc6

Zeller Defence : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Bf5

McCaffrey Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 b6

Karlsruhe Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 g6

Giertz-Peters Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e6  4.f3

Grosshans Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Bd7

 

 

 

BDG declined at 4th. move :

 

Vienna Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5

·         Polish Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.Bg5

·         Soller Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.Bc4

·         Sperling Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.d5

·         Harakiri Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.g4

o   Gunderam Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.g4 Bg6  6.h4

o   Kampars Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.g4 Bg6  6.g5 Nd5  7.fxe4

o   Tartakower Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.g4 Bg6  6.g5 Nd5  7.Nxe4

·         Tejler Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.Bf4

·         Diemer Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.fxe4

o   Unzicker Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.fxe4 Sxe4  6.Qf3 Nd6  7.Bf4 e6

Langeheinecke Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 e3

Weinspach Declination :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 e6

·         Pfrang Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 e6  5.fxe4 Bb4  6.Bd3 Bxc3+  7.bxc3 Nxe4  8.Be3

Lamb Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Nc6

O’Kelly Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 c6

·         McGrew Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 c6  5.Nxe4

·         Zilbermints’ Line :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 c6  5.a3

Albrecht Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 g6

 

 

BDG countergambits :

Elbert Countergambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 e5

Brombacher Countergambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 c5

Lemberger Countergambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5

·         Sneiders Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.Qh5

·         Soller Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.Be3

·         Rasmussen Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.Nge2

·         Alfred Lange Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.Nxe4

·         Endgame Variation : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.dxe5

Dries Countergambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 c5

Copy-Cat Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 e5

 

 

 

Related Gambit ideas :

 

Ryder Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Qxf3

Diemer-Duhm Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 e6  3.c4

Alapin-Diemer Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 e6  3.Be3

Rasa-Studier Gambit :  1.d4 Nf6  2.Nc3 e6  3.e4 d5  4.Be3

Milner-Barry Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 c6  3.Nc3 dxe4  4.f3

Von Hennig Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 c6  3.Nc3 dxe4  4.Bc4

Winckelmann-Reimer Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 e6  3.Nc3 Bb4  4.a3 Bxc3+  5.bxc3 dxe4  6.f3

Hübsch Gambit :  1.d4 Nf6  2.Nc3 d5  3.e4  Nxe4

Gedult Gambit  :  1.f3 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3

Staunton Gambit  :  1.d4 f5  2.e4 fxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.Bg5

·         Lasker Variation  :  1.d4 f5  2.e4 fxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.Bg5 g6  5.f3

Kingfisher Gambit  :  1.d4 f5  2.Nc3 d5  3.e4

Omega Gambit :  1.d4 Sf6  2.e4

Paleface Attack  :  1.d4 Nf6  2.f3

·         Dr. Willy Linder Gambit :  1.d4 Nf6  2.f3 e6  3.e4 Nxe4

Veresov  :  1.d4 Nf6  2.Nc3

Blackmar Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.f3

Fritz Gambit  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Bc4

Diemer-Rosenberg Attack  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Be3

Von Popiel Gambit  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.Bg5

·         Zilbermints Variation  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.Bg5 Bf5  5.Bxf6 exf6  6.g4 Bg6  7.Qe2 Bb4  8.Qb5+ Nc6  9.Qxb7

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit

 

 

Welcome to the wonderful world of the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit! Below you will find the moves, chess diagrams and analysis of all Blackmar-Diemer Gambit variations, and also of many related gambit ideas. You can read about this gambit in this article in Wikipedia. I also recommend buying Tim Sawyer’s Keybook 3 and visit Tom’s BDG Pages which is updated at a regular basis. Christoph Scheerer’s paperback book the Blackmar-Diemer gambit is also highly recommended!

 

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This is the basic position of the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit. White aims to achieve rapid development and active posting of his pieces in order to rapidly build up an attack at the cost of the gambit pawn. Below you will find a list of all variations in exciting opening system. I have given each variation a diagram, and some lines from an analysis with Rybka. I will also in some cases give my own (or others) evaluation and comments, and hope that this BDG site will inspire some of you to give this gambit a try. Life is too short to play boring chess openings!

 

 

 

 

BDG Accepted

 

 

Teichmann Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Teichmann Defence is probably the most popular system in BDG. In Sveinung Øklands collection of BDG games played by master players (“The Master BDG DB” from now on) the Teichmann Defence is played in 100 of the 500 games available. According to Tim Sawyer’s Keybook 3 the Teichmann is played in 25% of all BDG games, so if you want to become a strong BDG player you should not ignore this variation! The Black player’s intention is to exchange the knight, and hurry into the endgame a pawn up. Black has a solid position, and the d4 pawn is vulnerable.

 

 

 

Teichhouse Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bd7

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is named after Rob Rittenhouse, but I’ve never seen anyone play it. To me it looks dubious, and if the Black player hesitates exchanging minor pieces on f3 the retreat to h5 seems more logical.

 

 

 

Teichmann Retreat Variation : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bh5  7.g4 Bg6  8.Ne5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Teichmann Retreat Variation is played a lot (around 50% of the Teichmann games in The Master BDG DB), but is statistically weaker for Black than the Accepted Variation. The position after 8.Ne5 is already somewhat better for White.

 

 

 

Bennett’s Temptation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bh5  7.g4 Bg6  8.Ne5 Nc6  9.Qf3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The move 8…Nc6 is not good (8…c6, or 8...e6, or even 8…Nbd7 are more natural looking moves). Now White gets the advantage by playing 9.Bb5! However, the move 9.Qf3?! can encourage Black to first take the pawn on d4 (which is correct) and then the pawn on c2 (which is a terrible mistake). Tim McGrew has written a nice article about Bennett’s Temptation!

 

 

 

Teichmann Defence, Accepted Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bxf3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Accepted Variation is better than the Retreat Variation. After 7.Qxf3 the move 7…c6 is the logical choice, after which White has three main lines :

 

1)  8.g4 which is known as the Seidel-Hall Attack, but also known as the Harakiri Variation 

2)  8.Qf2 which is known as the Ciesielski Attack

3)  8.Be3 which is known as the Classical Variation, but also known as the Main Variation

 

 

 

Seidel-Hall Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bxf3  7.Qxf3 c6  8.g4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Seidel-Hall Attack is sometimes also called the Harakiri Variation. This variation is very sharp. Instead of completing his development White immediately starts his attack. In The Master BDG DB you can find seven games with this line. White wins three games and loses four. You can also find a couple of interesting “Harakiri” games on “Das Moderne Blackmar-Diemer-Gambit” website.

 

 

 

Ciesielski Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bxf3  7.Qxf3 c6  8.Qf2

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Ciesielski Attack is a more sensible line compared to the Seidel-Hall Attack. White defends the d-pawn with his queen without leaving the f-file. From f2 the queen can later be redeployed to h4, which often is a very useful square for the White queen.

In The Master BDG DB you can find ten games with this line, and White’s score is 55%.

 

 

 

Classical Variation : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bg4  6.h3 Bxf3  7.Qxf3 c6  8.Be3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This Classical Variation is also known as the Main Variation, and is probably White’s best choice. If you take a look in The Master BDG DB you will find 21 games with this line, and White’s score is 59,5% - which is not bad at all. The key position occurs after 8…e6  9.Bd3 Be7  10.0-0 Nbd7  11.Rf2 0-0  12.Raf1 which is not easy to assess. Tim Sawyer’s comment in his Keybook 3 : “The bottom line is that White is usually fighting for equality in the critical lines. However, if Black makes a little mistake, White can and does often win quickly!”

 

 

 

 

Bogoljubow Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Bogoljubow Defence is not played as often as the Teichmann Defence, but it is nevertheless quite a popular defence. It is named after GM Efim Bogoljubow which sometimes used to play this variation. Among the 500 games in The Master BDG DB there are 44 games with this variation. Statistically, White scores 65,9% (+24 = 10 -10) which is a little bit better than the Teichmann Defence.

 

 

 

Diemer Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bf4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

A likely continuation is 6…Bg7  7.Qd2 0-0  8.0-0-0 which is the starting position for the “Long Bogo” (baptized by Rajmund Emanuel). This variation is a good alternative to the variations which occur after the more commonly played 6.Bc4 move.

 

 

 

Peters Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Ne5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Peters Attack is a minor variation, and is not among White’s best options in this position. A likely continuation is 6…Bg7  7.Bc4 0-0  8.Bg5 Nc6  9.Nxc6 bxc6  10.Qd2 Bf5  11.0-0-0 with a slight advantage for Black.

 

 

 

Mad Dog Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.h4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Mad Dog Attack was promoted by Tom Purser, and the idea with 7.h4 is to build up a scary attack after 7…0-0  8.h5 Nxh5  9.Rxh5, but as Christoph Sheerer shows us in his book the White attack fails after 9…gxh5  10.Qd3 Qd6!

 

 

 

Nimzowitch Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.Ne5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Nimzowitch Attack is quite similar to the Peters Attack, and is also a minor variation which is not recommended. The knight jump to e5 is premature, and Black soon gets a slight advantage.

 

 

 

Kloss Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Kh1

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This continuation was recommended by Manfred Kloss as a way to prepare Be3, reinforcing the d-pawn. The idea is that if Black attacks the Bishop with Ng4, White has the retreat to g1 at his disposal.

 

 

 

Studier Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Qe1

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is also known as Hoff-Weidenhagen Variation. The Studier Attack is the most popular of all variations in Boguljobow. One of the reasons for this is the simple plan behind it. White plans to play Qh4, Bh6 and Ng5, followed by Bxg7, Rxf6, and Qxh7#. Black of course has several ways to stop this simple plan, and the most important subvariations can be found below.

 

 

 

Bangiev Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Qe1 Nc6  9.Qh4 Bf5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

Black’s intention with the move 9…Bf5 is to block the f-file and also to attack the c2-pawn. White’s best continuation now is 10.h3! Nb4  11.Bh6 with a standard attack.

 

 

 

Leisebein Variation : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Qe1 Nc6  9.Qh4 Bg4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

According to Christoph Sheerer this is the most critical variation in the Studier Attack. Black plans to exchange his bishop against Nf3 to weaken d4 and reduce White’s attacking potential on the kingside.

 

 

 

Kloss Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.Qe1 Nc6  9.Qh4 Ng4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Kloss variation is a bit tricky. White’s best move is 10.Bf4! when after 10…Bxd4+  11.Kh1 Bf6 we have a position where White has sacrificed two pawns, and must find a strong continuation to keep up the pressure. The correct move is probably 12.Qe1! as suggested by Tim Sawyer, but the position is complicated.

 

 

 

Studier-Zilbermints Variation:  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 g6  6.Bc4 Bg7  7.0-0 0-0  8.h3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Studier-Zilbermints Variation is also known as Orlov Line and Delayed Studier Attack. This variation is different from the regular Studier Attack, where 8.Qe1 is played immediately. IM Georgi Orlov suggested 8.h3, back in 1995.

Lev D. Zilbermints has later played many games with this line, and analysed it heavily. Usually Black plays passive, viz., 8...c6 9.Qe1 Nbd7 10.Qh4 Nb6 11.Bb3 and finds himself under a ferocious attack where ...Bg4 is no longer possible.

 

 

 

Ziegler Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 c6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Ziegler Defence has a lot in common with Caro-Kann, and is regarded as one of the most critical systems against the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit. White’s main continuation is 6.Bc4, but also 6.Bd3 and 6.Ne5 are sometimes played. In The Master BDG DB 6.Bc4 is White’s choice in 30 of the 32 available Ziegler games, and 6.Bd3 in the last 2 games. The overall score for White in the Ziegler defence is 67,2%.

 

 

 

Zilbermints Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 c6  6.a3

 

 

 

The Zilbermints Variation is a minor line in the Ziegler Defence, and I haven’t seen any games with this move.

 

 

 

Alchemy Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 c6  6.Bc4 Bf5  7.0-0 e6  8.Ng5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

An earlier move for White was 8.Ne5, but this was found not to be good enough after the reply 8…Bg6! The newer move 8.Ng5 not only attacks f7, but also e6. If you read chapther 3 of this interesting article from ChessCafe.com by Stefan Bücker you will see that after 8…Bg6  9.Ne2 Bd6  10.Nf4 Bxf4  11.Bxf4 0-0 Black gains a small advantage. There are however many interesting alternatives for both sides in this variation.

 

 

 

Kaulich Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 c5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Kaulich Defence is quite similar to the Brombacher Countergambit. David Gedult has suggested 6.Lf4 in this position (Christoph Scheerer calls it the Gedult Variation), but 6.d5 seems to be the main line here. White gets a space advantage, but the d-pawn can also become a target.  

 

 

 

Holwell Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Qd6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Holwell Defence is a minor defence, but “not as dumb as it looks” according to Christoph Scheerer. It can be compared to a popular variation in the Scandinavian Defence (1.e4 d5  2.exd5 Qxd5  3.Nc3 Qd6  4.d4 Nf6  5.Nf3), where White has traded his f-pawn for a tempo. Scheerer recommends 6.Ne5 whereafter Nb5 is a threat in many lines.

 

 

 

Euwe Defence : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 e6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is named after the former World Champion Max Euwe. It has some similarities to the French Defence. Compared to the French Defence Black is a pawn up, but at the same time White has a half-open f-file which gives him better attacking possibilities. In The Master BDG DB White scores 70,8% (+50 =9 -18) which shows just how dangerous White’s attacking possibilities really are. The most common continuation is 6.Bg5 Be7 and now either 7.Bd3 or 7.Qd2.

 

 

 

Sohm Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 e6  6.Bf4

 

 

 Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is a minor one which I haven’t seen in use. It doesn’t look right to block the f-file like this, so this can’t be recommended.

 

 

 

Clark Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3  e6  6.Bd3 Nc6  7.0-0

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The 6.Bd3 move can of course transpose into the main line after 6…Be7  7.Bg5, but can also lead to different lines like the Clark Gambit (6.Bd3 Nc6  7.0-0). White offers a second pawn, but I’m not sure how strong this is. After 7…Nxd4 I think Black’s position must be preferred.

 

 

 

Duthilleul Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 e6  6.Bg5 Be7  7.Bd3 Nc6  8.Ne4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Duthilleul Gambit is not played very much, and probably for good reasons. After 8…Nxe4  9.Bxe7 Qxe7  10.Bxe4 Qb4+ a lot of pieces are being exchanged. White has a space advantage though, so the evaluation is not very clear.

 

 

 

Zilbermints Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 e6  6.Bg5 Be7  7.Bd3 Nc6  8.0-0 Nxd4  9.Kh1

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Zilbermints Gambit was invented by Lev D. Zilbermints in 1993. The king hides from a future check, and White thus threatens to take the knight on d4. As White has sacrificed two pawns Black may want to exchange knights on f3, but according to Scheerer this is what White is hoping for, as he gets his pieces quickly into play. 9…c6 might be Black’s best continuation.

 

 

 

 

Leisebein-Zilbermints Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 e6  6.Bg5 Be7  7.Bd3 0-0  8.Qe2 Nc6  9.0-0 Nxd4  10.Nxd4 Qxd4+  11.Kh1

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

Peter Leisebein proposed 8.Qe2 and the rest is borrowed from the Zilbermints Gambit. Again, White offers a second pawn. He gets lots of open lines which is fun, but objectively Black is better here.

 

 

 

Gunderam Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bf5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is also known as Tartakower-Gunderam Defence, but Gunderam Defence or the Gunderam Variation are more common. Gerhard Gunderam wrote a book about this variation back in 1984, and also spent decades studying it – and playing it in many correspondence games. As White you can continue in many different ways, like 6.Bf4, 6.Be2, 6.Bd3, 6.Bc4 and 6.Nh4, but the most common move is 6.Ne5. In my opinion this is the most complicated BDG variation there is! You really have to know a lot of tactical variations before you pick this line in a serious game! In The Master BDG DB White scores 59,1% (+10 =6 -6).

 

 

 

Stader System :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bf5  6.Ne5 e6  7.g4 Be4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Stader system is a very complex line where both kings are being chased around. A typical continuation is 8.Nxe4 Nxe4  9.Qf3 Qh4+  10.Kd1 Nf2+  11.Ke2 Nxh1  12.Qxf7+ Kd8 etc. One slight error, and you’re toast.

 

 

 

Belka-Neumeyer Line :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bf5  6.Ne5 e6  7.g4 Be4  8.Nxf7

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Belka-Neumeyer Line is objectively not correct, and Black gets the upper hand after 8…Kxf7  9.Nxe4 Nxe4  10.Qf3+ Nf6  11.Qxb7 Qxd4!  12.c3 Qd5

 

 

 

Gunderam Sacrifice :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Bf5  6.Ne5 e6  7.g4 Ne4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

The Gunderam Sacrifice is an even more complex line than the Stader system. Black is sacrificing his bishop on f5 in order to gain an important tempo in the attack. If you play White and know the variations well you will get a clear advantage if you continue with 8.gxf5! Qh4+  9.Ke2.

 

 

 

Pietrowsky Defence : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Nc6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Gedult Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 a6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Ritter Defence : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 b6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Schuttler Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Nbd7

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Rook Pawn Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 h5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

BrentSpar Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Nxf3 Be6

 

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

BDG declined at 3rd. move

 

 

Pöhlmann Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 f5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is also known as Netherlands Defence.

 

 

 

Mieses Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nc6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is also known as the Kipke Defence and Nimzowitch Defence.

 

 

 

Zeller Defence : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Bf5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

McCaffrey Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 b6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Karlsruhe Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 g6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is also known as the Rodeck Defence.

 

 

 

Giertz-Peters Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e6  4.f3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Grosshans Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Bd7

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

BDG declined at 4th. move

 

 

Vienna Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Polish Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.Bg5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Soller Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.Bc4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Sperling Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.d5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Harakiri Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.g4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is also known as Blackmarian Harakiri Gambit and Diemerian Harakiri Variation.

 

 

 

Gunderam Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.g4 Bg6  6.h4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Kampars Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.g4 Bg6  6.g5 Nd5  7.fxe4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Tartakower Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.g4 Bg6  6.g5 Nd5  7.Nxe4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Tejler Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.Bf4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Diemer Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.fxe4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Unzicker Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Bf5  5.fxe4 Sxe4  6.Qf3 Nd6  7.Bf4 e6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Langeheinecke Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 e3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Weinspach Declination :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 e6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is also known as Weinsbach Variation and Weinsbach Declination.

 

 

 

Pfrang Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 e6  5.fxe4 Bb4  6.Bd3 Bxc3+  7.bxc3 Nxe4  8.Be3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Lamb Defence :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 Nc6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

O’Kelly Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 c6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

If you are interested in the O’Kelly Defence you should have a look at Eric Schiller’s analysis of the O’Kelly Defence , and also read this interesting article from ChessCafe.com by Stefan Bücker.

 

 

 

McGrew Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 c6  5.Nxe4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Zilbermints’ Line :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 c6  5.a3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Albrecht Defence  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 g6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

BDG countergambits

 

 

Elbert Countergambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 e5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Brombacher Countergambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 c5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Lemberger Countergambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

Tim McGrew has written an interesting article about the Lemberger Countergambit.

 

 

 

Sneiders Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.Qh5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

If you want to know the origin of this variant you should read this article at Tom’s BDG Pages.

 

 

 

Soller Attack :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.Be3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This Variation is also known as Diemer Attack.

 

 

 

Rasmussen Attack : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.Nge2

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Alfred Lange Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.Nxe4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is also known as Simple Variation.

 

 

 

Endgame Variation : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 e5  4.dxe5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Dries Countergambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 c5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Copy-Cat Variation :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 e5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Related Gambit ideas

 

 

Ryder gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Qxf3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation was invented by Dr. Ryder of Leipzig in the 1890s, and later popularized by Diemer who played it extensively for some time. If you consider playing the Ryder Gambit you should also be familiar with the Halosar trap, which might be useful in blitz games. In the Ryder Gambit White is prepared to sacrifice two pawns in order to get a swift queenside development. It is probably unsound, but it is not easy to play the Black side as White gets many open lines and a better piece development for his pawns. Please enjoy the following games!

 

 

 

Tautvaisas Defence : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Qxf3 Nc6

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Tejler Gambit : 1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.f3 exf3  5.Qxf3 Qxd4  6.Be3 Qg4  7.Qf2

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Diemer-Duhm Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 e6  3.c4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This gambit is covered very well at Jyrki Heikkinen’s webpages.

 

 

 

Alapin-Diemer Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 e6  3.Be3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Rasa-Studier Gambit :  1.d4 Nf6  2.Nc3 e6  3.e4 d5  4.Be3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This is the Rasa-Studier Gambit, which is also known as Studier-Rasa Gambit. This variation sometimes transposes into Euwe Defence lines.

 

 

 

Milner-Barry Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 c6  3.Nc3 dxe4  4.f3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation can easily transpose into other variations. After 4.-,Nf6 we have the O’Kelly Defence, and after 4.-,exf3  5.Nxf3 Nf6 we have the Ziegler Defence.

 

 

 

Von Hennig Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 c6  3.Nc3 dxe4  4.Bc4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

After 4.-,Nf6 or 4.-,Bf5 from Black this gambit is often followed up with 5.f3, which gives it a clear BDG flavour.

 

 

 

Winckelmann-Reimer Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 e6  3.Nc3 Bb4  4.a3 Bxc3+  5.bxc3 dxe4  6.f3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Hübsch Gambit :  1.d4 Nf6  2.Nc3 d5  3.e4  Nxe4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

Josh Specht has made a great video with analysis of this gambit.

 

 

 

Gedult Gambit  :  1.f3 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This can lead to a standard BDG position after 3.-,exf3  4.Nxf3 Nf6  5.d4

 

 

 

Staunton Gambit  :  1.d4 f5  2.e4 fxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.Bg5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

You can read about the Staunton Gambit in this Wikipedia article and find hundreds of Staunton Gambit games at Chessgames.com

 

 

 

Lasker Variation  :  1.d4 f5  2.e4 fxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.Bg5 g6  5.f3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Kingfisher Gambit  :  1.d4 f5  2.Nc3 d5  3.e4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Omega Gambit :  1.d4 Sf6  2.e4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

Tim McGrew has made an article about the Omega Gambit which you might want to take a look at.

 

 

 

Paleface Attack  :  1.d4 Nf6  2.f3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation can lead to a normal BDG position after 2…d5  3.e4 dxe4  4.Nc3

 

 

 

Dr. Willy Linder Gambit :  1.d4 Nf6  2.f3 e6  3.e4 Nxe4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Veresov  :  1.d4 Nf6  2.Nc3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

IM Andrew Martin discusses the Veresov in this fine article.

 

 

 

Blackmar Gambit :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.f3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Fritz Gambit  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Bc4

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Diemer-Rosenberg Attack  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Be3

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

 

 

Von Popiel Gambit  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.Bg5

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :

 

This variation is also known as Blackmar-Popiel Gambit.

 

 

 

Zilbermints Variation  :  1.d4 d5  2.e4 dxe4  3.Nc3 Nf6  4.Bg5 Bf5  5.Bxf6 exf6  6.g4 Bg6  7.Qe2 Bb4  8.Qb5+ Nc6  9.Qxb7

 

 

Rybka 2.3.2a evaluation :